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Four New Health-Boosting Ways to Top Your Toast

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Good old buttered toast — it’s a classic for a reason. A timeless tasty snack that takes virtually no effort to prepare.

Of course, there are some more creative ways you can top your toast, which are just as delicious and come with unique health benefits, too.

 

Here are a few toast topping ideas to play with.

Garlic olive oil toast topping idea

Olive oil and garlic butter

Granted, this one’s probably going to work the best if you enjoy the taste of Mediterranean cuisine, where adding olive oil to bread is a common pastime, and where garlic finds its way into every dish.

In any case, there are tremendous health benefits associated with both garlic and olive oil, and the two combined make for a fantastic savoury flavour which helps offset the dryness of the toast.

Among other things, olive oil has anti-inflammatory effects which researchers have compared to Ibuprofen1. Olive oil consumption is also associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke2.

Garlic, for its part, has been shown to significantly boost the immune system3, prevent illness, and even reduce blood pressure4.

cinnamon honey toast topping

Cinnamon and honey

If you’ve got a sweet tooth, topping your toast with honey is a no-brainer. But add a dash of cinnamon for a mild savoury undertone.

Many people are wary of including honey in their diet, as it’s got a sky-high sugar content. Keep in mind, though, that there are many important reasons why honey is a lot healthier than processed table sugar.

For one thing, honey is rich in antioxidants, with studies suggesting that it can even protect against heart disease5. For another, honey has been shown to improve cholesterol in diabetic patients6.

And cinnamon? Well, among other things, it’s been linked with improved insulin sensitivity and reduced blood pressure7.

This topping combo can make for a great pre-workout snack. The simple sugars will give you an energy spike while the increased blood flow from the cinnamon may help boost your performance and pump.

 

Salmon and spinach

Freshly cooked salmon and spinach is a brilliant toast-topping combo for anyone who’s eager to keep the hunger pangs at bay. It’s basically half a sandwich, anyway.

Salmon is a high protein food, with 20g of protein per 100g serving. Studies8 have shown that meals which contain protein leave you feeling fuller for longer.

Salmon is also known to be one of the richest sources of Omega 3 fatty acids out there, and these have been linked to a reduced risk of certain cancers9 and improved blood vessel health10, among other things.

Finally, spinach is a nutrient powerhouse food, containing good quantities of magnesium, iron, vitamins B2, B6, K, E, and A, calcium and potassium.

 

Melted dark chocolate and cayenne pepper

If you’re really in the mood for dessert, but still want to keep it reasonably healthy, why not try out the unusual combo of melted dark chocolate mixed with just a dash of cayenne pepper?  The dark chocolate will have a rich, bitter flavour, while the dash of cayenne pepper will add an exhilarating bite.

Of course, both of those toppings are known to have their benefits. Think of the combo as a healthy alternative to Nutella.

Cayenne pepper is rich in capsaicin, which causes your body to burn more calories11. It’s also thought to improve digestion and reduce the risk of stomach ulcers12.

Dark chocolate is rich in flavanols which are thought to improve blood flow13 and is also linked to improved cholesterol14, among other benefits.

 

Looking to improve your current diet and get long-lasting results which will improve your health and boost your energy levels?

For more healthy recipe ideas and guidance on nutrition, join us on our Pure Lifestyle course. See details about the course here.

 

1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16136122

2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25274026

3 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11697022

4 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24035939

5 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3005390/

6 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19817641

7 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2901047/

8 http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/87/5/1558S.long

9 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4418048/

10 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22317966

11 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23844093

12 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16621751

13 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18358827

14 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17513403

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